Mississippi Ridge Trail

Mississippi Ridge Trail -

Mississippi Ridge Trail starts at Homestead Picnic Shelter, crosses Cathedral Tree Drive and runs parallel to it until Henneger Point Picnic Area. The trail follows the bluff along the Mississippi River. An excellent view of the Mississippi River is available from Henneger Point. Bicyclists are welcome to bike the return trip back to Homestead Picnic Area via Cathedral Tree Drive (1.8 miles).
*Previous description from: Wyalusing State Park Visitor Newspaper, 2010
Unofficial Topo Map
Following is an unofficial trail description.
 Distance: 3.4-mile loop
Time: 2-3 hours (by foot)
Difficulty: 2-3
Bathrooms: Homestead Picnic Shelter and Henneger Point.
Parking: Park in the indoor group camp or the lot west of the Homestead Picnic area.

Description:
Mississippi Ridge Trail is a combination trail: hiking, biking, and xc-skiing. At this time, however, it is mostly used for walking and biking.

The trail head is located just west of the entrance to the indoor group camp to Hennegar Point

The first segment of the trail parallels the top of the ridge above the Mississippi River. This segment is 1.8 miles. A few spots have exposed tree roots. There are also a few spots with small rocks. This trail segment is characterized by a few gradual slopes.

The return segment follows Cathedral Tree Drive. The road is blacktopped and bumpy. Mature hardwood trees form a cathedral-like cover. A few moderate hills are located in the southern part of Cathedral Tree Drive. Although this is not one of Wyalusing State Park's main roads, keep an eye out for cars.

Henneger Point
The southernmost tip of the trail is Henneger Point. Henneger Point has a small stone picnic shelter. A large metal charcoal grill is located close-by. There are picnic tables and benches. This is a wonderful, quiet spot. The ridge overlooks the Mississippi River. Very few mosquitoes.

Spook Hill Mound Group
The northern part of Cathedral Tree Drive has many Indian Mounds. This area is called Spook Hill. Interpretive signs inform the visitor about the importance of the area. Paul Kosir, the author of Wyalusing History: The Park, the People, the Land, describes Spook Hill.

If arriving at Hennegar point by car, visit the old stone and wood fence located on a mowed grass path north of the shelter and 300 feet.